Goat Medications going to prescription only

Goat Medications

Goat Medications information You Need to Know for January 1st

Goat Medications are a necessity! Your goats can get sick, just like you can. Heck everyone has a day they feel crummy from time to time. When you get sick you take some medicine, but what about your goats? Just like people there are goat medications to help your animals get rid of disease when they’re under the weather. Traditionally, the antibiotics and other goat medications you need for your animals were available over-the counter, but that is about to change.

As of January 1, 2017, the FDA is moving antibiotics from over-the-counter purchases to prescription items only. This affects the feed additives and other oral antibiotics and will regulate how medically important antibiotics are administered to animals in feed or water. With compliments to Onion Creek Ranch, they have supplied a list  from Jeffers Supply with the products they cannot sell as of January 1, 2017. These products will be available via prescription from your vet only after that date.

No doubt you use a lot of these goat medications to keep your herd healthy and productive. If that is the case, you may want to stock up now before you have to go through your vet to get them. As the supply chain dries up these will be harder to come by through the end of the year. Manufacturers have already begun the process of re-branding some of these goat medications so they will be available for veterinary sale only.

It has already been reported that some of the antibiotic manufacturers are giving up their over-the-counter sales voluntarily, which puts liability issues related to improper use in the hands of the veterinarians.

If you don’t have a vet you can rely on, you better find one ASAP! Some people believe that within five years max all antibiotics will have to be purchased by prescription from a veterinarian.

LIST OF GOAT MEDICATIONS NOT BEING SOLD
OVER-THE-COUNTER ANY LONGER

A2L5  SpecLinx-50 2.65 oz pkt in stock
A2L6  LinxMed SP Powder 40 gm 1.41 oz in stock
A2L9  LinxMed SP Powder 80 gm in stock
A2N2  NeoMed 325 100 gm in stock
A2PK  PenAqua Sol-G 11.4 oz in stock
MOBS1  SMZ-Med 454 pkt mfg b/o
MOBT1  Tetroxy HCA-280 9.87 oz in stock
MOBT2  TetraMed 324 HCA 2# in stock
MOBT3  TetraMed 324 HCA 5# in stock
WJG5  Gallimycin PFC 250 gm in stock
A2DB  Dimethox Gallon in stock
49N1  Neomycin Oral Solution pint in stock
49N2  Neomycin Oral Solution gallon in stock
F7SZ  Sulmet 16oz out of stock
F7S6  Sulmet gallon out of stock
WJG4  BMD water soluble in stock
7VAA  Oxytetracycline powder 6.4 oz in stock
BVSAB  Oxytet Soluble 280 9.87 oz out of stock
CAA6  Aueromycin $G 5# in stock
F7AC  Aueromycin sol powder 25.6 oz pkt in stock
A2T8  Tetra-bac 324 2# in stock
A2T5  Tetra-bac 324 5# in stock
T5SA  Sav-A-Caf 6.4 oz in stock
T5SB  Sav-A-Caf 6# bag in stock
N2LC  LS 50 2.65 OZ in stock
UTA3  Rooster Booster 1.25# in stock
A2DA  Dimethox sol powder out of stock
BVSAA  Tylovet Soluble out of stock
E1T9  Tylosin out of stock
MOBAD  SulfaMed-G Sol Powder out of stock
CAE5  Scour Ease 8 oz pkt in stock

ANSWERS TO SOME COMMON QUESTIONS:

(These following questions and answers are straight from the FDA PDF. You can download the full PDF on the FDA website)

Since the deadline for implementation is only a few months away, producers, feed mills and veterinarians need to start preparing now so that everyone understands the new goat medications being affected by this change and is in compliance before January 1st.

  1. What is a Veterinary Feed Directive Drug?
    A “veterinary feed directive (VFD) drug” is a drug intended for use in or on animal feed which is limited by an approved new animal drug application filed pursuant to section 512(b) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), a conditionally approved application filed pursuant to section 571 of the FD&C Act, or an index listing pursuant to section 572 of the FD&C Act to use under the professional supervision of a licensed veterinarian (21 CFR 558.3(b)(6)). Use of animal feed bearing or containing a VFD drug (VFD feed) must be authorized by a lawful VFD (21 CFR 558.6(a)(1)).
  2. Who determines whether a drug is VFD drug?
    When a new animal drug application is submitted to FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) for approval, CVM evaluates the drug for safety and effectiveness, and as part of the review process, determines whether the drug will be an over-the-counter (OTC) drug, a prescription (Rx) drug, or a VFD drug (limited to drugs used in or on animal feed).
  3. What is a “combination veterinary feed directive drug”?
    A “combination veterinary feed directive (VFD) drug” is a combination new animal drug (as defined in § 514.4(c)(1)(i)) intended for use in or on animal feed which is limited by an approved application filed pursuant to section 512(b) of the FD&C Act, a conditionally approved application filed pursuant to section 571 of the FD&C Act, or an index listing pursuant to section 572 of the FD&C Act to use under the professional supervision of a licensed veterinarian, and at least one of the new animal drugs in the combination is a VFD drug. Use of animal feed bearing or containing a combination VFD drug must be authorized by a lawful veterinary feed directive (21 CFR 558.3(b)(12)). If any component drug in an approved, conditionally approved, or indexed combination drug is a VFD drug, the combination drug is a combination VFD drug and its use must comply with the VFD requirements.
  4. What are Category I and Category II drugs and what is their relevance to VFD?
    All new animal drugs, including VFD drugs, approved for use in or on animal feed are placed in one of two drug categories, Category I or Category II (21 CFR 558.3(b)(1)). Category I drugs require no withdrawal period at the lowest use level in each species for which they are approved. Category II drugs either require a withdrawal period at the lowest use level for at least one species for which they are approved, or are regulated on a “no-residue” basis or with a zero tolerance because of a carcinogenic concern regardless of whether a withdrawal period is required.

(download the full PDF on the FDA website)

Are any of these antibiotics on this list going to affect you? Let us know below.

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